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Lesson Plan: Snow (Science - Grade 2)

Subject:  Science

Grade: 2

Lesson Objective: To learn about snowflakes and then answer questions about them

Common Core StandardCCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.2.1- Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

Materials:

Starter:

Say:

  • What do you know about snowflakes?  (Allow the students to answer.)

Main:

Say:

  • Snowflakes fall when it is cold outside.  Snow forms in clouds.  When the air is below 32 degrees Fahrenheit, the water vapor in clouds turns into ice crystals.
  • Those ice crystals clump together to form a snowflake.
  • Raise your hand if you have ever seen snow falling or played in the snow.  Snow can be beautiful when it is falling.  It is so quiet and peaceful.
  • What are some of the things that you like to do in the snow or would like to do in the snow if you could?  (Allow the students to answer.)
  • People like to go sledding, have snowball fights, make snow angels, build snowmen and go skiing and tubing.
  • In many places, it snows in the winter.  Some places have snow from October to April.  Some places have snow for only 2-3 months and some places only get snow once in a while.
  • In other places, there is always snow on the ground.  Those places are close to the north and south poles.
  • You are going to be reading about snow.  You are then going to answer questions about what you have read.
  • Does anyone have any questions?

Feedback:

Say:

  • Who would like to share your answers?  (Allow the students to share)

Related lessons:

Emergency Sub Plan: Snow - Reading (Gr2)

Emergency Sub Plan: Snow - Writing (Gr2)

Emergency Sub Plan: Snow - Science (Gr2)

Emergency Sub Plan: Snow - Math (Gr2)

Check out our complete Emergency Sub Plans Library!

Written by Kimberly Greacen, Education World® Contributing Writer

Kimberly is an educator with extensive experience in curriculum writing and developing instructional materials to align with Common Core State Standards and Bloom's Taxonomy.

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