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Every-Day Edit: Et tu Brute 

 

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Activity Key:
 
Uncorrected Text:
 
beware the Ides of March. Those words come from William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar. In the play, a soothsayer, or a person able to predict the future, spoke those words. He were telling Julius Caesar that he was about to dye. Some other famous words were also uttered around the same time – Et tu, Brute?” Those were reportedly Caesar’s last words. They mean “and you, Brutus” He spoke them to his freind, Brutus, who was part of the group there too assassinate Caesar. Some say Caesar spoke the words as a warning to Brutus. Others think he spoke the words cuz he was sad his friend had betrayed him.
 
Answer Key:
 
Beware the Ides of March. Those words come from William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar. In the play, a soothsayer, or a person able to predict the future, spoke those words. He was telling Julius Caesar that he was about to die. Some other famous words were also uttered around the same time – Et tu, Brute?” Those were reportedly Caesar’s last words. They mean “and you, Brutus?” He spoke them to his friend, Brutus, who was part of the group there to assassinate Caesar. Some say Caesar spoke the words as a warning to Brutus. Others think he spoke the words because he was sad his friend had betrayed him.
 
 
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