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Superintendent Shares Confidence His Teachers Will Ensure PARCC Success

Superintendent Shares Confidence His Teachers Will Help Students Succeed in PARCC Tests

Common Core and its assessment tests will be making their way to classrooms come 2015, and some administrators find that teachers will rise to the challenge.

Canal Winchester schools Superintendent Jim Sotlar said his district "will face challenges in 2015, but he's confident that teachers and staff members will help students achieve success and reach district goals," according to an article on ThisWeekNews.com.

According to the article, Sotlar said "one of those challenges is the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) tests."

Sotlar, the article said, "believes these two assessments are 'very challenging, not only for the students but for the teachers and staff in preparing for the test,'" the article said. "The new tests have two components. The first test, to be administered in February, is a performance-based assessment."

"The performance-based [assessment] allows students to show what they can do with what they have learned in the first seven months of school," Sotlar said.

The second test, the article said, "which is taken at the end of April or early May, is an end-of-year assessment that measures what students learned in an entire school year."

"These tests will be more rigorous and lengthy," Sotlar said.

According to the article, the scores on the two tests "are combined to give each student one score."

"In addition to the PARCC assessments, Sotlar said the next challenge is to ensure the current class of high school freshmen is prepared for new graduation requirements," said the article. "According to the Ohio Department of Education website, the new graduation requirements did not change the number of course credits students need to receive a diploma. However, students will now earn points toward graduation on seven year-end exams, including English I and II, algebra I, geometry, integrated math I and II, physical science, American history and American government. Students can earn one to five points on each exam, based on their performance, according to the website."

To be eligible for a diploma, the article said, "students must earn a minimum of 18 points from scores on these tests. While the new testing will be challenging, Sotlar said the district hopes to have continued success on the assessments because of a dedicated workforce."

"Our staff members aren't just teachers; they are educators," Sotlar said. "Their passion for student success is contagious. Every day, they rise to the challenge of meeting national and state education policies while finding creative ways to reach students and ignite a passion for learning and success both in the classroom and beyond."

Read the full story and comment below.

Article by Kassondra Granata, Education World Contributor

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