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STEM News Roundup: Do You Know More STEM Than a Fourth Grader?

STEM News Round-Up: Do You Know More STEM Than a Fourth Grader?

This week in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Math) News, an Ivy League school makes science in rural communities a priority, a 14-year-old becomes America's top young scientist by harvesting ocean energy and a hip-hop science program reaches the Midwest.

Can You Pass This 4th Grade Math & Science Test? 

TheRoot.com has asked Princeton Review math and science expert Toni Eversley to design a test that a fourth grader should be able to pass. See the test here- and see if you are equipped to help your children with today's current math and science standards.

Check it out here. 

Dartmouth College to Help Rural Libraries Update Science Capabilities

Dartmouth is partnering with the National Science Foundation with the project “Rural Gateways: Fostering the Development of Rural Librarians as Informal Science Facilitators” with the help of a $3 million grant.

"The projects' goal is to develop rural libraries and librarians into informal STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) learning centers,” said Eurekalert.org.

The project is seeking to help 110 libraries by “providing them with multi-media STEM materials in a book club-science café format and connecting them with local science partners.”

Read more here.

14-Year-Old Becomes ‘America’s Top Young Scientist’ for Harnessing Energy from the Ocean

Eighth-grader Hannah Herbst has been named America’s Top Young Scientist after designing a small turbine called BEACON (Bringing Electricity Access to Countries Through Ocean Energy Collection).

"Herbst spent four months researching her idea, she wrote in another blog post, before she designed the turbine as a computer model, and then produced 3D-printed prototypes. Herbst even got approval from the city of Boca Raton to test her design in the intercoastal waterway,” said TechInside.com.

Her calculations estimate that BEACON could charge up to three car batteries simultaneously in less than an hour.

Talk about one inspiring young lady.

Read more here. 

Hip-Hop & Science Merge in NASA Physics Education Program

Honeywell and NASA are partnering to bring its hip-hop physics education program- FMA LIVES! Forces in Motion to more than 40 public, private and military-connected middle school in the Midwest.

According to a statement from Honeywell, “[U]sing live actors, hip-hop songs, music videos, interactive scientific demonstrations and video interviews with scientists and engineers from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the show teaches Newton's Three Laws of Motion and Universal Law of Gravity.”

It also provides educators with National Science Standards-based teaching resources, streaming videos, music from the show and a comprehensive educational guide with lesson plans.

Read more here

Stay Tuned: Global STEM Alliance to Hold Conference on Current State of STEM

The Global Stem Alliance (GSA) of the New York Academy of Sciences will be hearing from industry and non-profit organizations about the current state of STEM.

The session, called The New STEM Workforce Model: Support, Technology, Education & Mentorship, will be open to media and will be held Nov. 9.

Topics of discussion will include how to diversify talent in STEM Careers, advancing professional development for some non science, creating collaborative teams and how the role of science policy advances the STEM workforce, said GSA in a statement.

Read more here

Compiled by Nicole Gorman, Education World Contributor

11/03/2015

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