Search form

Rosetta Stone Launches Reading Program for Children

Rosetta Stone Launches Reading Program for Children

Rosetta Stone Inc. has recently introduced a digital literacy product designed to help young children learn to read.

The product, created in partnership with literary specialists at Boston-based Lexia Learning, is called Rosetta Stone Kids Reading, and "takes aim at developing core literacy skills for children ages 3 to 7. Rosetta acquired Lexia Learning in 2013," said an article on BizJournals.com.

"Our Lexia Reading Core5 solution is already helping millions of children in America learn to read at grade-level in school; now, with Rosetta Stone Kids Reading, we're providing an engaging, effective way for parents to help their kids learn to read at home," said Steve Swad, president and CEO of Rosetta Stone, in a statement.

The product, the article said, "is a significant step into the broader education-tech market for Rosetta Stone, which built its business on language-learning software."

"Recently, Rosetta Stone has shifted away from a kiosk and CD-ROM business to a cloud-focused software company," the article said. "The company launched a kids division about a year ago with two application products, Lingo Letter Sounds and Lingo Word Builders."

Rosetta Stone Kids Reading is now available online and can be downloaded for iOS and Android, the article said. "Like Rosetta Stone's language-learning programs, the new product utilizes adaptive technology that responds to a learner's strengths and weaknesses, providing targeted instruction."

Read the full story and comment below.

Article by Kassondra Granata, Education World Contributor

 

Latest Education News
Sexual assault cases persist from elementary school up through college, so what's the solution to make schools safer?
Some experts are arguing that more classrooms that utilize blended learning will help decrease the high number of...
Parents in the Hazelwood School District are no different than many parents across the country in that they don't...
Philadelphia, the eighth largest district in the nation, has been battling school funding issues for the past few years...
Investigating the education candidate that never was.