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National Council for the Social Studies Endorses Newsela’s ‘Students Vote 2016’

National Council for the Social Studies Endorses Newsela’s ‘Students Vote 2016’

The National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) has officially endorsed Newsela’s 'Students Vote 2016,’ a ninth-month program that engages students in the on-going presidential election every step of the way.

’Students Vote 2016' is designed for all students as it is available in five different reading levels, one of many unique components to the program.

"The NCSS Board of Directors endorsed 'Students Vote 2016’ following a close review of the program and its goals. 'Students Vote 2016’ provides a learning experience that will help students develop civic knowledge,” said Newsela in a statement.

According to Newsela, ‘Students Vote 2016’ helps K-12 students develop critical civic knowledge and literacy skills by:

  • Reading and getting informed about their government, candidates and the issues with daily election news at their just-right reading level
  • Voting in presidential primaries with other students across their state and across the country
  • Discussing their real-time election results while comparing them to state-wide and primary results from their peers in other states
  • Voting in the largest student-powered general presidential election in the Fall of 2016

Students will able to get a heard-start in participating in the country’s democratic process.

This upcoming Super Tuesday, for instance, students in the Super Tuesday states will be able to cast their own votes; teachers will be able to compare how students voted across classrooms and even schools.

Read more about Newsela’s ‘Students Vote 2016’ here.

Article by Nicole Gorman, Education World Contributor

2/24/2016

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