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Several Educators from the Atlanta Cheating Scandal May Be Able to Return to Schools

Several Educators from the Atlanta Cheating Scandal May Be Able to Return to Schools

While not all 11 former educators convicted in the Atlanta cheating scandal are so lucky, several still have teaching licenses and therefore may be able to teach again Georgia’s public schools.

According to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, "at least five of the educators convicted in the test-cheating conspiracy could resume their careers, even though their criminal sentences have not yet been served. Most are free while they are appealing their convictions.”

This is because although all had their licenses suspended, state officials don’t automatically remove licenses for crime convictions and the suspensions have ended.

The article was not able to confirm if any of the teachers have found employment yet, but the lawyer for former teacher Angela Williamson admitted his client was looking for a job while appealing a two-year prison sentence.

Altogether, the cheating scandal resulted in the investigation of almost 200 Atlanta educators; many of those received some kind of license suspension and eight had them revoked. Ultimately 11 educators stood trial and faced the harshest of charges, with most receiving prison time or home confinement.

These are the educators that the Atlanta Journal-Constitution speculates could be back in Georgia Public Schools soon, if they are not already.

Read the full story.

Article by Nicole Gorman, Education World Contributor

4/14/2016

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