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It was more than 100 years ago at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, that man first flew in an engine-powered aircraft. Before that time, such an event was thought to be centuries away! Included: Five lessons to celebrate the Wright brothers' achievement plus links to 20 more lessons.

It was on December 17, 1903, that Orville Wright stayed aloft in his engine-powered glider for 12 seconds; later that same day, Orville's brother, Wilbur, would travel more than 850 feet in a flight that remained airborne for 59 seconds.

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Wright Brothers

Education World has tracked down the best Internet resources for classroom use. Click here to access Wright brothers' biographical information, timelines, and photographs plus links to more than a dozen additional lesson plans!
Just a couple of years later, another of the Wright's aircraft would travel 25 miles in 40 minutes. And, a dozen years after that, airplanes would play an important role in World War I.

FIVE LESSONS FOR TEACHING ABOUT THE WRIGHT BROTHERS

This week, Education World provides five lessons about the Wright brothers. Click each of the five lesson headlines below for a complete teaching resource. (Appropriate grade levels for each lesson appear in parentheses.)

Make a Model of a Wright Flyer
Create a model of the Wright brothers' engine-powered glider. (Grades 3-12)

The "Wright" Puzzle
Complete a crossword puzzle based on a brief biography of the Wright brothers. (Grades 3-8)

The Wright Brothers on "Hollywood Squares"
Test knowledge of the Wright brothers by playing "Hollywood Squares." (Grades 3-12)

"Wright-ing" Biographies for Young Readers
Older students write high-interest, low-vocab biographies for young readers. (Grades K-12)

Wright Brothers Timeline
Create a photo timeline of the lives of the Wright brothers. (Grades K-12)

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Click here to access Wright Brothers' biographical information, timelines, and photographs plus links to more than a dozen additional lesson plans!

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