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Professional Development for Educators


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Are you looking for books to help yourself develop new skills in classroom management or new approaches to teaching? The professional development titles below will help you improve instruction and your teaching skills. Click the links below to learn more about Our Editors' Choices of recommended books. Then it's your turn to share titles that you recommend. and tell why you value them. With your help, we will build the best list on the Web of Best Books for educators' professional development.

 


Be sure to check out our other Best Book archives:
Best Books for Students
Best Books for Developing Classroom Teaching Themes
Best Books for Parents and Parenting Best Books for School Leaders

 

Teaching Outside the Box
Subtitled, "How to grab your students by their brains," this paperback edition of LouAnne Johnson's well-reviewed book promises a lot of practical guidance for today's classroom teacher. Including a step-by-step plan to make the first week of school a success, the book's advice ranges across classroom management and motivational topics to strategies for teaching the reluctant reader. This is a book not only to read, but also to share with colleagues.
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Education: The Practice and Profession of Teaching
Yes, this is a textbook, costing $100 in paperback, not counting a companion book you can get by adding $20 and a package of online resources you can get from www.mylabschool.com. However, the book's fans claim its comprehensiveness and readability make it a worthwhile investment even outside the context of education courses. Case studies that start each chapter, a feature called "teachers and the law," and a guide to certification, are all special features of this most recent edition.
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Now
It's Your Turn!

We've shared a few Editors' Choices for educators' professional development. Now it's your turn to contribute to the Readers' Voices section below. Do you have a book that you have found to be effective and practical? Just click here to share it!

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Don't miss our Editors’ Choices for literature to support Classroom Teaching Themes and books for Parents. We're waiting for you to add your Readers' Voices there too.

Multicultural Education: Issues and Perspectives
No doubt one of the most important topics in education today, multicultural education, is thoroughly treated in this 500-page sixth edition. The book deals with such topics as high-stakes testing in the context of multiculturalism, asking whether such tests are a social justice issue. The book also raises the fascinating question of trying to define what "culture" really is in modern, information-swamped America. With activities listed at the end of each chapter, this book is both thought provoking and practical.
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Reluctant Disciplinarian: Advice on Classroom Management
From a Softy Who Became (Eventually) a Successful Teacher

A long title, but luckily it really tells you why this book is valuable. So many people do get into education for what might be called "soft" reasons -- love of children, love of learning, a desire to make people's lives better. Those of us who have such "soft" motivations in our personality often find it hard to be the militaristic, marching-orders person that classroom management sometimes requires. Here's our guidebook!
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A First-Year Teacher's Guidebook
This practical book can help not only first-year teachers, but also established professionals, with eminently useful ideas for classroom management, using technology, handling parent conferences, and many other topics. Especially handy for the early-career teacher are sections on teaching in rural and urban settings, education issues, and first day / first week / first month ideas.
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Democracy and Education
John Dewey's 1916 book on the interrelationship between education and democracy is as important, as it approaches its centennial, as it was when it was first hailed as a master work. The modern reader of education books will find the sweep and clarity of Dewey's approach to be a refreshing break from the highly specialized and jargon-filled books being churned out today. With no hesitancy, Dewey declares his topics to include, "The Significance of Geography and History," "Educational Values," "Theories of Knowledge," and "Theories of Morals." An essential text for the complete education library!
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The First Days of School: How to Be an Effective Teacher
Harry and Rosemary Wong are, of course, among the deans of education writing in America, and this book is evidence of why. In addition to providing a lot of practical advice -- brought to life with more than 300 photos and illustrations -- the book focuses on three essential characteristics of a successful teacher, namely, positive expectations, classroom management, and lesson mastery, as well as on basic and future "understandings" that are part of the teaching life.
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How We Think
John Dewey's classic treatise on what exactly "thinking" means, and how, starting from that definition, it makes sense to educate students to actually do it, is not light beach reading, but this relatively brief book is well worth a rainy weekend. Together with Dewey's "Democracy and Education," "How We Think" provides the modern reader with a clear understanding of the foundations of American educational thought.
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Teaching With Love and Logic: Taking Control of the Classroom
Jim Fay and David Funk embody their method of classroom management in the term "love and logic," and follow up this concept with chapters like "Apply Consequences with Empathy." Aimed ultimately at transferring the responsibility for maintaining order from the teacher to the student, this method is a "golden mean," a balanced approach that sees both teachers and students as real human beings. A treasure!
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Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools
It's hard to believe that it's been 15 years since this powerful book hit the education scene, and if you've never read it, get this paperback edition and a box of tissues, because these stories from our nation's poorest schools have lost none of their emotional punch. Kozol's more recent books, including "Amazing Grace" and "Shame of the Nation," demonstrate that we have not solved the problems dramatized in "Savage Inequalities," but it's worth returning to this 1992 volume as well, to once hear Kozol's exquisite voice raised in just anger.
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If You Don't Feed the Teachers, They Eat the Students
This book's best joke may be its title, but it's still very refreshing to have a humorous approach taken to the endless supply of practical tips that the art of teaching needs. In particular, this is one of the best books for teachers to give to administrators as "presents..." well, a gift that hopefully will keep on giving back to the teachers. Lots of great stuff in here that teachers can make happen, but it's really a book that can give administrators ideas to help the staff in many human ways in this most human of professions.
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The Sixty-Second Motivator
Okay, this isn't really an education book per se, but if there's any profession that faces motivation challenges, it's teaching: Teachers have to motivate students to learn, to behave, and maybe even to grow up a little bit. They also have to motivate administrators to learn, to behave, and maybe even to grow up a little bit (just kidding). Seriously, self-motivation is a huge part of any job that requires a person to motivate other people, and this is certainly a useful approach to self-motivation for time-strapped teachers.
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Rules in School
Nothing is more wonderful than a well-run classroom, where students have internalized the classroom rules, and where those rules "add up" to a logical way to maintain a good learning environment. Another great thing is the positive impact the experience of learning to internalize a good set of rules has on the kids beyond the classroom. This book from the folks at The Responsive Classroom offers a method of thinking about developing rules, including developing consequences for breaking rules. Enjoy! But no talking!
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32 Third Graders and One Class Bunny
Teaching is a human job, and this book is a great one for capturing the day-to-day delights of leading a classroom of little kids through a vital year of their young lives. The fact that the book's author reports, as of press time, presumably, that he had sung "Happy Birthday" to students in his classroom 657 times, tells a lot about the larger impact a teacher has. Meantime, the bite-sized essays in this book are perfect for the hurried teaching life.
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Discipline in the Secondary Classroom
Many books on classroom management are aimed at K-8 or, more often, the early end of that range. So here is a "grown up" classroom management book that takes an approach and adopts a style more in keeping with the college-preparatory level (whether the kids are actually sitting down and getting enough work done to get into college is another question!). In particular, this book's appendices, including observation and analysis worksheets and a student satisfaction survey, are a good commbination of the practical tool often found for younger grades and the more "adult" methodology appropriate to high schoolers.
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Subjects Matter: Every Teacher's Guide to Content-Area Reading
A guide to developing ambitious thematic units, a "balance diet" reading list of 150 books of interest to teens, and special help tips for students who struggle with reading, all help make this book a strong candidate for becoming a core content-area-reading playbook for middle school and high school teachers.
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Inside Mrs. B's Classroom
Leslie Baldacci was a journalist who took the stories about the crisis in urban education very seriously, choosing to teach on Chicago's South Side. Like Jonathan Kozol, Baldacci is a writer who has the power to touch a reader emotionally, along with the reporter's discipline with details. Also like a journalist, Baldacci delivers her story in digestible short chapters that suit the free time teachers have to read.
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Papers, Papers, Papers: An English Teacher's Survival Guide
Many people who aren't teachers often say they couldn't do the job because they'd have "all those papers to grade." Of course, the art teacher may not have them, but the English teacher in middle school and especially in high school certainly has a carload of papers to grade. This book addresses this challenge not only with practical tips, but also with broader professional development ideas, so that the reader not only gets help with the paper load, but can actually become a more effective coach for young, aspiring (or reluctant) literary critics.
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School Success for Kids With Asperger's Syndrome
Subtitled "A Practical Guide for Parents and Teachers," this book is an important resource to help both teachers and parents deal with a set of challenges that can be very profound and certainly is being recognized as affecting ever higher numbers of kids. Asperger's is a syndrome some think of as milder than autism, but sharing some characteristics. The book includes how to recognize Asperger's, suggests best practices in school, and offers suggestions as to how to deal with the school system's administration, among many other topics.
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You Have to Go to School -- You're the Teacher!
This second edition offers 50 new tips within its 250 classroom management strategies that are intended "to make your job easier and more fun." This book is very practical for teachers, not only in having lots of brief ideas that are well organized, but also in reflecting the teacher's day to day life. For example, one chapter is called "They're Not Here Yet," in which the reader is given specific guidance under such headings as "Get to School Early," "First Name Versus Surname," and "Don't Take Their Behavior Personally."
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The Vocabulary Teacher's Book of Lists
Of course there is no such job description as "Vocabulary Teacher," but then again, all teachers are really engaged at least in part in educating their students about certain groups of words and terms. Therefore, interestingly, a book like this one, which includes lists of words by word roots, lists of words related to specific subjects like Native Americans or myths, lists of words related to measurement and geography, and so on, can actually be useful to a wide range of teaching assignments. This is just one of a number of "list" books out there, but this one may have the broadest application.
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How We Think
John Dewey's classic treatise on what exactly "thinking" means, and how, starting from that definition, it makes sense to educate students to actually do it, is not light beach reading, but this relatively brief book is well worth a rainy weekend. Together with Dewey's "Democracy and Education," "How We Think" provides the modern reader with a clear understanding of the foundations of American educational thought.
Click to learn more or to purchase this book.


Nonfiction Matters: Reading, Writing, and Research
This is an important book for several reasons: one, nonfiction reading, writing, and research is a relatively new emphasis in elementary school, and in turn, nonfiction seems to be an important key in retaining boys' interest in reading. The appendixes in this book include various forms, reading logs, and so on, and a set of extremely valuable bibliographies of well-crafted nonfiction books in various categories. Written by Stephanie Harvey. Happy reading!
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Understanding By Design
Grant Wiggins is one of the most important education thinkers, with a unique and logical point of view on a fundamental aspect of school -- assessment. In this expanded second edition, Wiggins and co-author Jay McTighe convincingly turn the traditional assessment model on its head. Instead of creating curriculum and then figuring out assessment, they argue that we first determine what kids should learn, second how we're going to assess that learning, and only then design curriculum to enable students to pass. Not many education books crack the top 1,000 in Amazon sales, but this one does. Enjoy!
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The Writing Teacher's Book of Lists
Subtitled, "with Ready-to-Use Activities and Worksheets," this book adds an extra level of practicality to the idea of a book of lists. Interestingly, the activities and worksheets in each section come before the lists of words themselves, which demonstrates the emphasis the book places on its practical features. The lists represent great variety, with some based on traditional groupings, like synonyms, etc., and others based on such groupings as "Advertising Words," "Words of Folklore," or special lists for student writers such as "Traits of Good Writers" and "Books for Students about Writing and Writers."
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Teacher Under Construction: Things I Wish I'd Known!: A Survival Handbook for New Middle School Teachers
One of the books from the revived Weekly Reader presses, this handbook (it's only 110 pages) is a good, brief, practical guide for the middle school educator. Features such as a parent conference checklist, a "5-10-15-20" rule of time management, and other common-sense tips are indeed the kinds of things experienced teachers can usefully offer newcomers. A great balance between the nuts and bolts practicalities and the human aspects of the job, and a book concise enough to fit into your bag!
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The Teacher's Calendar
Chase's famous Calendar of Events -- that huge book journalists use to help them develop filler material for their newspapers by doing funny little stories on National Hog Calling Day -- has many spin-offs, and one is this extraordinarily useful annual calendar for teachers. If you simply used this calendar to assign a brief research report every day of the school year, which would give each student in a class of 30 six assignments during a 180 day school year, would make this book well worth its price. Enjoy!
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Rookie Teaching for Dummies
Of course, we don't read the Dummies books because we really are dummies -- real dummies don't read at all! We read them for their irreverent and yet practical advice, and this example is no different. From the introduction, where the author stresses that he's not going to give you tear-jerking stories, education theory, or salsa recipes, through to the top-ten lists that conclude Dummies titles, this book is fun and also functional.
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The Bully Free Classroom
Subtitled "Over 100 Tips and Strategies for Teachers K-8," this useful volume provides well over 100 bite-sized ideas that are quick to read and common-sensical. Bullying, of course, is a terrible phenomenon in schools and famously hard to deal with effectively. So, a relatively brief (166 pages) resource that offers a wide variety of ideas and approaches is probably one of the most valuable items you can have on hand as a teacher in the modern classroom.
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Rainbows, Head Lice, and Pea-Green Tile: Poems in the Voice of the Classroom Teacher
These poems deal with the humorous experiences of being an elementary school teacher, and also touch on some of the more human, poignant moments the teaching life brings. One poem, "The Threshold," dramatizes the moment a new teacher is about to step into the classroom to meet a new class of kindergarten students. "...I hesitate/For beyond this door/The future awaits me/ ...I feel a little silly/I can't stand here all day long/After all, they're just children/What could possibly go wrong?"
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Young Investigators: The Project Approach in the Early Years
This book from Teachers College Press applies the project approach to teaching, which has traditionally been associated with the middle grades, to early childhood education. This can not only energize and focus early childhood lessons, but also lay a foundation for inquisitive thought that students can benefit from for the rest of their school years, even for the rest of their lives.
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Teaching Science for Understanding: A Practical Guide for Middle and High School Teachers
We all know that the United States has to "play catch-up" with science and math teaching, compared to other countries, and this book is a serious attempt to contribute positively to that effort. Science may be especially susceptible to passive, direct-instruction styles, and this author instead advocates active, inquiry-based learning. A unique feature of this book is a set of excerpts from popular science textbooks along with suggestions for making the content contained in those books come alive for students.
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Montessori in the Classroom: A Teacher's Account of How Children Really Learn
Montessori is one of those words in education that evokes a little mystery, especially for those of us who haven't really been immersed in the theories or practice associated with the name. This book takes an unusual approach to introducing us to Montessori: It is really a teacher's first-person account of the experience of teaching using Montessori methods, together with enough theory and practice to make it possible for other teachers to pick and choose those concepts that seem most applicable to their own "non-Montessori" classrooms.
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Case Studies for Teacher Problem Solving
With 37 detailed case studies, this book takes almost a Harvard Business School approach to illuminating the problems teachers must solve in classrooms every day. Certainly, reading this book would present a classroom teacher with a number of situations that, even if he or she might never encounter those situations exactly, should open up new avenues of thought concerning situations indeed faced regularly. An advantage to this approach is its open-endedness; the reader is inspired to think independently rather than prescribed definite solutions.
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The Morning Meeting Book
A very practical book -- step-by-step guidelines for implementing a morning meeting in any K-8 classroom; 45 greetings; 66 group activities; and ideas for adapting the morning meeting idea to classes with a lot of second-language learners. The essential concept is to make everyone feel that it matters that he or she is in school -- including the teacher! This books comes from the folks behind the Responsive Classroom approach to teaching.
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Horace's Compromise: The Dilemma of the American High School
First published in 1984, this is Theodore Sizer's eloquent call to arms for school reform. In a new preface, Sizer addresses encouraging movements to create better schools, reduce class size, and improve assessment and teaching, but also points out that many of the problems that plague the American high school have remained the same over the last quarter century. This is one of the field's modern classics, and no education library is complete without it.
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Educative Assessment: Designing Assessments to Inform and Improve Student Performance
Grant Wiggins is one of the most important education thinkers and writers because he has a unique and logical point of view on a fundamental aspect of school -- assessment. In this book, Wiggins attempts to envision what assessment reform would look like if it were to succeed, and then fleshes out his vision with strong logic and significant detail. Wiggins shows his ability to take the discussion to a higher level in the later chapters of this book by arguing that getting assessment right is not only an education priority but in fact a moral imperative.
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Foreign Language Teacher's Guide to Active Learning
This book starts with a grounding in brain research and applies its key concepts to making foreign-language teaching in the middle and high school more active and engaging. With practical activity suggestions and other considerations for teaching to multiple intelligences, activities related to specific themes such as holidays and based on specific creative ideas, like Jeopardy-style games, the book culminates in chapters on alternative assessment and incorporating technology. With foreign-language teaching so often falling into well-worn patterns, and with our national level of language skills lagging far behind other countries, this is a valuable addition to the education bookshelf.
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Home, School and Community Relations: A Guide to Working with Families
Said to be for students as well as teachers, administrators, and parents, this book is probably of most use to teachers and principals. Author Carol Gestwicki is revisiting this topic in this 2006 book, having published a similar title in 1996. With practical guidance on such topics as how to deal with "Troublesome Attitudes and Behaviors," the book can certainly help schools navigate the tricky waters of community relations. With research showing that community engagement is highly correlated with better school performance, this guidance can be very valuable indeed.
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Paideia Proposal
First published in 1982, this book by philosopher Mortimer J. Adler is a modern classic. Taking the ancient Greek word paideia as its touchstone, this very brief book (under 100 pages) powerfully links education with democracy and proposes that society must make education the very center of its energies if it is to truly be democratic. Written before the technology revolution, the underlying argument of this book is, interestingly, even more important 25 years later.
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Strategies That Work: Teaching Comprehension for Understanding and Engagement
This useful book by Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis takes as its first chapter title and as its philosophy, "reading is thinking," and builds upon that fundamental realization beautifully. The book, however, is not a simple collection of tips for teaching reading, but really a marriage of practical suggestions and an underlying model for how students learn to read better and, importantly, how to think more effectively.
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The Psychology of the Child
An essential book in the history of educational theory, this is a great introduction to the work of Jean Piaget. First published in French in 1966, this book lays out Piaget's six stages of sensory-motor intelligence and goes on to build upon that foundation a schema that tries to encompass the development of cognitive abilities right up to adulthood. Surprisingly brief and readable, this is one of those books every education library should contain.
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Shakespeare: To Teach or Not to Teach -- Teaching Shakespeare Made Fun From Elementary to High School
Shakespeare probably accounts for more shelf space than any author in history, including lots of books about teaching Shakespeare at all levels. This book focuses on making Shakespeare fun to teach and to learn, and on elementary through high school. It's a particularly good book for the non-drama specialist or for a teacher who might feel reluctant to tackle Shakespeare "too early."
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Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace One School at a Time
Greg Mortenson is an American who tried to climb K2, the world's second-tallest mountain, but didn't make it. Dangerously ill after this effort, he was sheltered for seven weeks in a Pakistani village and promised to return to build its first school. This grew into the Central Asia Institute, which has built more than 50 schools across Pakistan and Afghanistan. An engaging story about reaching across cultures through education.
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What Great Teachers Do Differently: Fourteen Things That Matter Most
Todd Whitaker is one of the prolific education writers who continually remind us that teaching is primariliy an art, though it is surrounded by a lot of science (and pseudo-science). As such, Whitaker looks at great practitioners and focuses on what they do that distinguishes them from less-than-great teachers. Among the intriguing chapter headings are: "Restoring Trust," "The Angry Parent," "Handling the High Achievers," and "Treat Everyone As If They Were Good."
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The Elementary Math Teacher's Book of Lists
Subtitled, "with Ready-to-Use Patterns Worksheets," this book brings list-mania to math. We often forget, in thinking about math as driven by the familiar symbols for operations, that learning math is as much about learning the meaning of a universe of concepts as it is about learning specific operational skills. This approach offers the practicality of worksheets and activities along with the more conceptual value of covering the major groups of concept words in elementary math.
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Classroom Instruction that Works: Research-Based Strategies for Increasing Student Achievement
For a book from one of the major education associations -- the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD) -- this is a relatively compact book of under 200 pages that offers nine categories of instructional strategies, along with the research and statistics to back up their efficacy. Among the nine are Summarizing and Note Taking; Homework and Practice; Nonlinguistic Representation; and Cooperative Learning. The emphasis in the book is on elementary instruction. Written by Robert Marzano and others.
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Cultural Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know
This is one of the modern classics in education, first published to much bru-ha-ha in 1987. The author, E.D. Hirsch, argues that education is suffering because we lack a strong common "bank" of cultural knowledge -- i.e., what every American should know. He even goes so far as to include a list, a huge list of 5,000 essential items of knowledge. Seen at the time as a conservative, even reactionary text, Hirsch argues that it is precisely those less advantaged students who would benefit from schools focusing more on getting these basic 5,000 items into every kid's head.
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No Contest: The Case Against Competition
One of the most prolific education writers, Alfie Kohn is also one of the most entertaining and thought-provoking. This book makes perhaps the most profound argument Kohn has ever fielded -- that "healthy competition" is an oxymoron, that competition is not an essential or desirable aspect of human nature, but rather a part of our animal nature that we must transcend. Of course our educational system has a love-hate relationship with competition: we don't want kids to feel like losers, but our society demands that schools identify a small number of winners. A truly essential read!
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The Absorbent Mind
Maria Montessori's classic underscores her belief that learning is a natural characteristic of the human being, and that the process of education is best conducted as a nuturing of that natural impulse, rather than something that has to be imposed on one's otherwise savage little charges. Along with this is her belief, much more radical in its time than now, that people's personalities are not fixed at birth, but that a child's early years are in fact crucially formative.
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The First Six Weeks of School
The critical first six weeks of school is the focus of this practical book, aimed at building a strong foundation in terms of motivation, cooperation, responsibility and self-control. The book, published by the Responsive Classroom folks, includes daily plans along with commentary for K-2, 3-4, and 5-6, and adds an extensive collection of games, activities, greetings, songs, read-alouds, and other resources that can help make the goal of starting the year strong a reality.
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Educational Psychology: Windows on Classrooms
This is a big Prentice-Hall textbook that comes packaged with an access code to a teacher prep Web site -- just in case the 672 pages leave you wanting more! The Web site includes more than 150 video clips and more than 200 "artifacts," as well as 500 plus research papers. If you really want to own a truly comprehensive resource on educational psychology, then, this $115 paperback could actually be a bargain. In its 7th edition, no doubt, it's the book you'd be assigned by many courses in this field.
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Add your voice to our list of books for Professional Development for Educators!

The Education World Editors’ Choices above represent just a handful of the great books that might be used to support educators' professional development. Now we’re waiting for your review! Simply send us your review of a favorite book in 100 words or fewer and your review will be added to the other Readers’ Choices that appear below.

kidztchr7 recommends
So, You Want to Become a National Board Certified Teacher?: A Handbook of Teacher Tips for Successfully Completing the NBPTS Certification
by Jerry L. Parks
So, You Want to Become a National Board Certified Teacher? is one the very best (and affordable!) books for this type professional development. It is user-friendly and includes key words teachers should include in their portfolios.

Be the next to add your review to this page!


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03/01/2008


 

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