You are here

5-Minute Fillers: Language, Math, and More

Volume 32

 

Pose the following question to students to start a lively discussion, or use is as a prompt for a quick journal-writing activity:

What if a distant relative died and left you in charge of dividing up his $1,000,000 estate among all your family members? How would you divide the money?

Palindrome Numbers
Builds math computation skills

Have students

  • Choose any 3-digit number.
  • Reverse that number to create its palindrome.
  • Add together the palindromes.
  • Take the sum of the two numbers and add it to its palindrome.
  • Take the sum of those two numbers and add it to its palindrome again.

What do you notice about the third sum you came up with? It is a palindrome! Challenge students to test this idea. Is it always the case? Do you always end up with a palindrome sum at the end of three computations that begin by adding palindromes?

Sample computation:
Start with 362.
Reverse the number to create its palindrome. (362 becomes 263.)
Add together the two numbers. (362 + 263 = 625)
Take the sum of the two numbers and add it to its palindrome. (625 + 526 = 1251)
Take the sum of those two numbers and add it to its palindrome. (1251 + 1521 = 2772).
Your third sum, 2772, is a palindrome!

 

 

Article by Gary Hopkins
Education World®
Copyright © 2004 Education World

 

 
 

 

 

 

Comments

Sign up for our FREE Newsletters!

Thank you for subscribing to the Educationworld.com newsletter!