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Division With
Remainders
Active-ity

Subjects

Mathematics
--Arithmetic

Grade

3-5
6-8

Brief Description

In this active-ity, students get up and moving -- and learning about division with remainders.

Objectives

Students will

  • engage in an activity that involves math in a visual and active way.
  • apply what they learn to solving simple division-with-remainders problems.

Keywords

division with remainders, division, remainders

Materials Needed

  • yarn (if you do the activity indoors) or chalk (if you do the activity outdoors)

Lesson Plan

You can take students outdoors for this lesson, or you can do it indoors. The lesson demonstrates in a very visual and active way the concept of division with remainders.

Planning for the Lesson
To start, count the number of students present in your class. Can that number be divided by 3, 4, or 5? Draw chalk circles on the pavement outside, or use yarn to form large circles on the floor indoors.

  • If you have 15, 18, 21, 24, 27 students present, those numbers are divisible by 3; so you will draw three circles on the ground/floor.
  • If you have 16, 20, 24, 28 students present, those numbers are divisible by 4; so you will draw four circles on the ground/floor.
  • If you have 15, 20, 25, 30 students present, those numbers are divisible by 5; so you will draw five circles on the ground/floor.
If you have 17, 19, 22, or 26 students present, you might want to include yourself in the activity so that you can have a number of people that is divisible by 3, 4, or 5.

Now That Youre Ready
Now that you have the chalk or yarn circles set, invite students to move about and stand in one of the circles. When each student has settled into a circle, ask them to count the number of students in their circle and in the others. (Some circles might have more people than others in them.)

Then challenge students to move about so that each circle ends up having an equal number of students in it. Write on the white/blackboard the math problems that this exercise illustrates. For example, if you have 25 students and five circles,

  • 5 groups of 5 students = 25 students (5 x 5 = 25)
  • 25 students divided equally among five circles results in 5 students in each circle (25 ÷ 5 = 5)
Next, draw/create a number of circles that will not result in an equal number of students in each circle. Using the same 25 students we used above, you might draw/create six circles. Ask students to arrange themselves equally into the six circles. Students will arrange themselves into groups of four but, when all is done, there will be one student left outside the circles.
25 students divided among six circles result in 4 students to a circle with one student left out
25 ÷ 6 = 4 remainder 1 (or 4 r1)
Continue creating different numbers of circles from chalk or yarn. Based on this sample class of 25 students, you might
  • create three circles: Students will arrange themselves and see that 25 students divided among 3 circles = 8 students to a circle remainder 1 (25 ÷ 3 = 8 r1)
  • create seven circles: Students will arrange themselves and see that 25 students divided among 7 circles = 3 students to a circle remainder 4 (25 ÷ 7 = 3 r4)
  • create two circles: Students will arrange themselves and see that 25 students divided among 2 circles = 12 students to a circle remainder 1 (25 ÷ 2 = 12 r1

Reinforce the Lesson
Next, you might create a worksheet that looks something like the table below. Students will employ the same skills they used to group themselves as they divide the Number of Students among the circles provided.

Note: On your worksheet, the circles will be larger. Students will be able to draw equal numbers of dots in each circle, just as the divided themselves equally among the yarn/chalk circles you created.
For each number of students in the first column, students can draw dots in the circles to represent how that number will be divided equally among the circles and how many of that number of students (dots) will be left out (remainder). Answers appear in red type.
Number of Students
Arranged Into These Circles
Remainder
Write the Equation
25
 ? ? ? ? ? ? 
1
25 ÷ 6 = 4 r1
15
 ? ? ? ? 
3
15 ÷ 4 = 3 r3
18
 ? ? ? ? ? ?  ? 
4
18 ÷ 7 = 2 r4
12
 ? ? ? ? ? 
2
12 ÷ 5 = 2 r2
16
 ? ? ? ? ? ? 
4
16 ÷ 6 = 2 r4
27
 ? ? ? ? ? 
2
27 ÷ 5 = 5 r2
13
 ? ? ? ? 
1
13 ÷ 4 = 3 r1
19
 ? ? ? 
1
19 ÷ 3 = 6 r1
22
 ? ? ? ? ? ? 
4
22 ÷ 6 = 3 r4
27
 ? ? ? ? 
3
27 ÷ 4 = 6 r3
Extend the Lesson
Finally, you might extend the lesson by introducing a worksheet -- like one of the ones below -- for reinforcement/additional practice:

Assessment

Score the work sheet you create, or score one of the linked work sheets above.
Work in small groups with any students who complete the work sheet with less than 80% accuracy.

Lesson Plan Source

EducationWorld.com

Submitted By

Gary Hopkins

National Standards

MATHEMATICS: Number and Operations
GRADES Pre-K - 2
NM-NUM.PK-2.1 Understand Numbers, Ways of Representing Numbers, Relationships Among Numbers, and Number Systems
NM-NUM.PK-2.2 Understand Meanings of Operations and How They Relate to One Another
NM-NUM.PK-2.3 Compute Fluently and Make Reasonable Estimates
GRADES 3 - 5
NM-NUM.3-5.1 Understand Numbers, Ways of Representing Numbers, Relationships Among Numbers, and Number Systems
NM-NUM.3-5.2 Understand Meanings of Operations and How They Relate to One Another
NM-NUM.3-5.3 Compute Fluently and Make Reasonable Estimates
GRADES 6 - 8
NM-NUM.6-8.1 Understand Numbers, Ways of Representing Numbers, Relationships Among Numbers, and Number Systems
NM-NUM.6-8.2 Understand Meanings of Operations and How They Relate to One Another
NM-NUM.6-8.3 Compute Fluently and Make Reasonable Estimates
GRADES 9 - 12
NM-NUM.9-12.1 Understand Numbers, Ways of Representing Numbers, Relationships Among Numbers, and Number Systems
NM-NUM.9-12.2 Understand Meanings of Operations and How They Relate to One Another
NM-NUM.9-12.3 Compute Fluently and Make Reasonable Estimates

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    08/31/2010



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