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S I T E     R E V I E W
SEPTEMBER, 1997

A
National Center to Improve Practice
in Special Education

http://www.edc.org/FSC/NCIP/ncipnet_top.html
GRADE LEVEL: Parents & Professionals

A CONTENT:
This is the Web site of The National Center to Improve Practice (NCIP), which promotes the use of technology for improved education for students with physical, mental and social disabilities.

A AESTHETICS:
The site uses the same colors and graphics throughout, giving it a consistent quality. The spacing and colors used allow for easy viewing of the pages.

A+ ORGANIZATION:
Each area of the Web site is listed on the home page and each subsequent page has a navigation menu at the bottom providing access to all of the sections from each page. At the top of each page is a graphic that describes which section the user is viewing.

REVIEW:
This is a very specific Web site for a specific audience. It provides a lot of information for its audience. The site includes discussions about the use of technology for students with disabilities and an online discussion area with the authors of articles published in CEC's journal, TEACHING Exceptional Children. There is also an online workshop for developing creativity in students with disabilities (although it seems the topic for this section changes periodically). The site contains a guided tour featuring early childhood classrooms considered outstanding in their teaching practices. Other areas of the site include information on particular technologies and the NCIP Library, which has downloadable material on technology and special education. The site has a "What's New" section so visitors can immediately review new material and users can even subscribe to a mailing list for the site. Finally, readers can find links to additional resources on technology and special education. This is a great place for special education teachers to keep up with the latest developments in technology, to keep in touch with others in their teaching community, and to gather new ideas and approaches to teaching students with special needs.


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