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Should Students Learn About Data Analytics in the Classroom?

Should Students Learn About Data Analytics in the Classroom?

As schools continue to use student data to its advantage, and jobs continue to rank data analytics high on their requirement lists, teachers are wondering if they should teach data analytics in the classroom. 

According to a new report released by the Education Development Center, In's Oceans of Data Institute, "the skills necessary for the data analytics jobs of tomorrow aren't being taught in K–12 schools today," said Frank Smith in an article on EdTechMagazine.com.

"The Profile of the Big-Data Enabled Specialist projects a workforce shortage for data-driven positions," Smith said. "Based on a 2011 McKinsey & Co. report cited by the Oceans of Data Institute, 'By 2018, the United States alone could face a shortage of 140,000 to 190,000 people with deep analytical skills as well as 1.5 million managers and analysts with the know-how to use the analysis of big data to make effective decisions.'"

According to Smith, "key skills needed by a Big Data specialist include:

  • The ability to define problems and articulate questions
  • The ability to develop deep knowledge of data sources
  • The ability to develop methods and tools
  • The ability to stay current on emerging technologies, data types and methods

"The shortage cited by the report aligns with the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ projection of a massive shortage in the IT workforce by 2020," he said. "According to the agency, there will be 1.4 million openings but only 400,000 computer science graduates with the necessary skills to fill the positions."

Read the full story and comment below. 

Article by Kassondra Granata, Education World Contributor

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