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Brown v. Board of Education

 

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Activity Key

Uncorrected Text

Oliver Brown sued the Topeka, Kansas school board for refusing to allow he's daughter to attend a all-white school. After a federal district court dismiss his claim that school segregation violated the Equal Protection Clause Brown and his lawyers appealed the case to the Supreme Court. The lead counsel for Brown and the other plaintiffs was Thurgood Marshall, whom would later become the first black justice of the Supreme Court. In may 1954, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that racial segregation in public schools were unconstitutional. Chief Justice Earl Warren wrote in the courts decision that in "public education the doctrine of "separate but equal" has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.”

Answer Key

Oliver Brown sued the Topeka, Kansas school board for refusing to allow his daughter to attend an all-white school. After a federal district court dismissed his claim that school segregation violated the Equal Protection Clause, Brown and his lawyers appealed the case to the Supreme Court. The lead counsel for Brown and the other plaintiffs was Thurgood Marshall, who would later become the first black justice of the Supreme Court. In May 1954, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that racial segregation in public schools was unconstitutional. Chief Justice Earl Warren wrote in the courts decision that in “public education the doctrine of separate but equal has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.”

 

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