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Steve Haberlin is a Ph.D student at the University of South Florida, where he also works as a teaching assistant, supervising and teaching pre-service teachers. Steve holds a master's degree in gifted education from U.S.F. and has worked with gifted students for seven years in various classroom models. His research has been published in Gifted & Talented International, Childhood Education, and The Qualitative Report.
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Recent Posts By This Blogger

Examine any standard lesson plan template and you’ll likely to see the same categories and domains: standards, learning objectives, step-by-step plans, accommodations for various student populations, assessment, etc. Lesson-planning is fundamental...
When you’re in the classroom, are you really there? When a student asks you a question, are you really listening? When collaborating with other teachers on lesson plans, are you truly present? Of course, you say. I’m in the classroom; I’m with the...
The lotus flower has been a symbol in Buddhism tradition as well as Hinduism and Egyptian culture.  For example, Buddhists have come to associate the flower with beauty and purity and as a symbol of spiritual awakening. The flower is certainly...
In recent years, educational experts have debated the concept of differentiation—that is varying/altering curriculum, content, and teaching methods to meet the individualized needs of students. Let me join this conversation by saying that first, I...
Teaching is a very stressful profession. I have personally experienced the demands of being a teacher and observed colleagues also deal with the stressors of the job, ranging from high-stakes testing, demanding parents, increased paperwork,...
During 2018, why not resolve to reach all learners in the classroom, despite where they fall in terms of academic ability? Included in that resolution might be the goal to further challenge gifted students—a promise to help them learn something new...
I often dream about what I would change in education if I could wave a magic wand. I try to work towards those changes in the real world--but dreaming, I guess, is easier. I think imagining how we might better serve students is an important first...
As teachers, we should carefully examine what we consider important in classrooms. For instance, what language, customs, mannerisms, and social graces do we value above others in school settings. The concept of cultural capital theory was proposed...
I have discovered a simple, yet effective way to remain inspired as a teacher. It costs nothing, does not take much time, and always works. Before I reveal “my secret,” I want to address the topic of motivation and teacher burnout. The teacher...
When explaining to pre-service teachers how to differentiate in the classroom, I usually revert to drawing a simple diagram. It consists of three circles containing the words: content, process, product (I wish I could give proper credit to whoever...

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