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White House Officially Launches Open eBooks App to Support More Free, Online Resources

White House Officially Launches Open eBooks App to Support More Free, Online Resources

As part of the White House’s Open eBooks Initiative, Michelle Obama and the White House announced the official launch of the Open eBooks App, which reportedly has $250 million worth of books in its library.

The impressive collection of mostly copyrighted materials is thanks to a series of partnerships with major publishers and public libraries.

"First, ten major publishers, including Penguin Random House and National Geographic, provided the texts,” said EdSurge.

" Second, to create the app and curate the eBook collection, the White House partnered with the Digital Public Library of America, First Book, and The New York Public Library, as well as digital books distributor Baker & Taylor and the Institute of Museum and Library Services.” T

he Open eBooks Initiative is intended to provide America’s classrooms with as many free, online resources as possible, a continuing goal of the Obama administration.

Getting started using the app is simple.

The app is available to "any educator, student or administrator at one of the 66,000+ Title I schools or any of the 194 Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) schools in the United States,” as well for hundreds of special education teachers regardless of what school employees them.

"To access the app, educators can sign up on the OpeneBooks.net site and receive codes for their students. Using those codes, students can download the free Open eBooks app to mobile devices and access a library of eBooks,” said EdSurge.

Read the full story.

Article by Nicole Gorman, Education World Contributor

2/26/2016

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