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Survey of Preschool Teachers Reveals Most Struggling to Make Ends Meet

Survey of Preschool Teachers Reveals Most Struggling to Make Ends Meet

A survey from the National Association for the Education of Young Children has revealed that most early childhood educators are struggling to make ends meet due to low pay.

Despite the importance of early education. especially as it becomes a priority in both the upcoming presidential election agenda and in the No Child Left Behind overhaul, early ed workers are paid notoriously low.

"A 2014 report from the Center for the Study of Child Care Employment found that preschool teachers typically only make six dollars more an hour than fast-food workers (with mean hourly wages of $15.11 and $9.07, respectively) -- though early childhood educators are often required to have a bachelor's or associate's degree,” said the Huffington Post.

The survey found that despite 90 percent of responding early education workers saying a love for children motivated them to go into the field, almost as much (84 percent) said day-to-day living was tough due to insufficient salary and benefits.

Fortunately, the survey also revealed that voters recognize the importance of and are willing to support early education workers.

"Eighty-five percent of voters said they think it's 'very important" or 'extremely important’ that early childhood educators are well-compensated. Over 90 percent of surveyed voters also said that they "play a critical role in helping children grow and develop,” the Post said.

Read the full story.

Article by Nicole Gorman, Education World

12/8/2015

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