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The New Teacher Advisor

Forming Good Habits


It takes 27 days to form a habit. Remember when your mother used to ask you to make your bed every day? Then, after a while, you simply started making it on your own --without having to be reminded to do it. Making your bed every day had become a habit.

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In my column, Laying the Groundwork, I discussed the importance of brainstorming expectations and procedures as part of laying the groundwork for building good habits. This time, I want to discuss in a little more detail the kinds of habits we want to build in our students -- and how we can build them.

When thinking about the kinds of good habits you want students to develop, go back to that list of expectations and procedures you created. For me, for example, it's important that students enter my classroom, check their mailboxes, and start working on their focus assignment before the first bell rings. It's important that when I use the quiet signal, my students get quiet and focus on me. I expect my students to stay in a quiet straight line when I walk with them down the hall. It's also important to me for students to be silent, with a clean area, before I dismiss them. Those types of habits, as well as others, also might be important to you. If you're not really sure what you expect of your students, then take some time right now to brainstorm those actions and behaviors that you want to become habits for your students.

Okay, you have your list. You might be asking yourself, "Why is it important that I help build these habits?" The reason is to save yourself stress later on in the school year. Spring semester might seem like a long way away, but it will come around a lot faster than you think. Students who are not following good habits in the fall have a tendency to let spring fever get out of hand. Behavior can become more erratic then, and without good habits in place, students are more likely to get out of control. By setting the standards at the beginning of the year and turning good behaviors into good habits, you save yourself a lot of time and stress later.

But how can you build in students the good habits you expect? First, clearly explain your expectations to students. Next, make sure students practice the correct actions and behaviors daily. (It's especially important to practice behaviors over and over again during the first couple of weeks of school.) Third, be consistent about requiring specific behaviors. If you see students not meeting your expectations, don't be afraid to stop and take the time to practice the correct action or behavior right then and there. For example, if I notice that many students are entering the classroom and "hanging out" without starting their work


Classroom Management Series

Be sure to see all the articles in Emma McDonald’s classroom management series:

* Laying the Groundwork
* Forming Good Habits
* Setting the Tone
* Freedoms and Responsibilities
* Consistency and Flexibility
* Motivational Tools

before the bell rings, I stop everything and practice my expectations. I have students file out of the classroom and re-enter correctly. If students are not following my quiet signal, we stop immediately and practice until they get it right. By doing that consistently, students begin to see that I will hold them accountable for their actions. After 27 days or more of doing the same actions over and over again, the behaviors become a habit for students. What you want to achieve is a classroom in which students know what to do and when to do it. That is a well-disciplined classroom.

You might find, of course, that as the year progresses, you need to stop and practice your expectations again. That is perfectly normal and can be thought of as "maintenance."

Before you know it, however, your students will be entering the classroom and doing exactly what you expect of them -- whether you are there to remind them or not. Good behavior has become -- just like making your bed each day -- a habit. In the end, that's precisely what we strive to accomplish.

As you work toward that goal, remember the maxim "Good habits are hard to break" -- and practice, practice, practice.

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